Leaves of Absence

Overview

When you need to spend more than three consecutive days away from work, it's considered a leave of absence, unless it is planned vacation. Review this information to learn more about actions you should take before, during, and after your leave of absence.

How and when to request a leave of absence

Submit a leave request via HR Umbrella. You will need to be logged in to the UCSF Pulse Secure VPN to do so. If you cannot access HR Umbrella, let your manager know. Your manager can submit a leave request on your behalf.

Request a leave of absence 30 days in advance of the proposed effective date. If this is an unplanned leave, immediately inform your manager of your need for a leave of absence, submit a written request for leave and provide the required documentation and/or certification to support your request for a leave of absence. 

General leave of absence information

A leave of absence (LOA) is a period of time when you may be away from your primary job, while maintaining your status of employment. A LOA is defined as an approved absence from work for a specified period of time for medical (including pregnancy), parental (bonding), family care, military or personal reasons. 

Below are types of leave of absences that may be taken in addition to having a formal LOA request on file in HR Umbrella.  If you have any additional questions about your specific leave need, Health employees should contact the Health Benefits and Leave Management Team at 415-353-4545, option 2, or email [email protected]. Campus employees may reach out to the leave specialist.

Types of leaves

Leave taken before or after birth during any period of time an employee is physically unable to work because of pregnancy or a pregnancy-related condition

You may not need to use the leave in one continuous block of time. However, when it is medically necessary, you may take the leave intermittently or on a reduced-schedule basis.

More on pregnancy disability leave

Leave taken for time away to:

  • Care for a spouse, child, or parent who has a serious health condition
  • Care for a newborn within one year of birth
  • Care of a child for adoption or foster care within one year of placement

You may not need to use the leave in one continuous block of time. However, when it is medically necessary, you may take the leave intermittently or on a reduced-schedule basis.

More on family care and/or parental bonding leave

Leave taken on account of a serious health condition that renders the employee unable to perform the essential functions of his or her job for a specified continuous period of time or an intermittent period of time.

You may not need to use the leave in one continuous block of time. However, when it is medically necessary, you may take the leave intermittently or on a reduced-schedule basis.

More on medical leaves

Leave taken for an injury, illness or exposure arising out of the course and scope of employment.

More on workers' compensation

Leave of absence for any regular, full-time staff member who is called to serve on active military duty.

More on military leaves

Leave for qualifying exigencies that arise when the employee’s spouse, son, daughter, or parent is on covered active duty or has been notified of an impending call or order to covered active duty. Qualifying exigencies include making alternative child care arrangements for a child of the deployed military member, attending certain military ceremonies and briefings, and making financial or legal arrangements to address the military member’s absence.

More on qualifying exigency leave

Leave allowing an eligible employee who is the spouse, son, daughter, parent or “next of kin” of a covered veteran with a serious injury or illness to take up to a total of 26 workweeks of unpaid leave during a single 12-month period to provide care for the veteran.

More on military caregiver leave

A personal leave of absence is unpaid and is at the discretion of your manager to approve or deny.  In addition, there will be a impact to your benefits as a personal leave is not a protected leave of absence.  Therefore, please be sure to read the Leave without Pay fact sheet linked below.

View Leave without Pay fact sheet

Bereavement, jury duty, professional development, voting, and others.

More on other leave types