Compensation

About This HR Service

UCSF Medical Center's most valuable resource is its employees. The Compensation team strives to develop pay and reward programs to attract, motivate, and retain outstanding staff to carry out the mission of the Medical Center. Compensation uses a structured, consistent process to deliver services. Collaboration and a partnership with management are key to delivering successful business solutions, while ensuring fair and equitable practices across the institution.

Compensation provides consultative, research, and analytical services to:

  • Develop and administer UCSF Medical Center compensation practices and processes in accordance with University of California system-wide policies.
  • Develop and implement rewards strategy, merit and equity pay guidelines, bonus plans, pay administration guidelines, market survey analyses, and job classification processes.
  • Assist management in job design and position classification structure.
  • Participate in salary surveys to obtain competitive pay data and practices.
  • Interpret Federal Wage and Hour Laws and University of California salary policies.
  • Compensation Training
ArticleCategoryFamily
RecruitmentRecruitment
Recruitment/Filling a Vacant Career PositionRecruitment
Requesting or Extending a StipendClassification and Compensation
Classification of PositionsClassification
ReclassificationClassification
How to Post a JobRecruitment
Incentive Award Program (IAP)Classification and Compensation
Equity ReviewClassification and Compensation
Merit IncreaseClassification and Compensation
Compensation (General)Classification and Compensation
Name Title Email
Carlos Mendoza Interim Compensation Manager [email protected]
Varvara Layko Compensation Coordinator     [email protected]
Joshua Naftel Compensation Lead [email protected]
Andie Romanoff    Compensation Analyst [email protected]  
Catherine Nielsen Compensation Analyst [email protected]
Lizzie Kennon Compensation Analyst [email protected]
Oscar Conrado Compensation Analyst [email protected]  

 

 

UCSF Medical Center Human Resources
3360 Geary Blvd.
Suite #301
San Francisco, CA 94118

Phone: (415) 353-4688
Fax: (415) 353-4690
UCSF People Connect

The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), governs the process that Compensation Analysts use to determine whether a position is either eligible for over-time pay for hours worked in excess of 40 per week (non-exempt) or is paid a flat sum for hours worked, even if they exceed 40 hours within a workweek (exempt).

FLSA History

The Fair Labor Standards Act, (FLSA), is a federal law dating back over half a century which establishes certain minimum requirements for employees' hours of work, wages, premium overtime and payroll records.
The FLSA, identifies two types of employees: non-exempt employees and exempt employees:

  • Non-exempt employees are employees who, based on the duties performed and the manner of compensation, are required to account for time worked and sick leave, vacation, and other leave on an hourly and fractional hourly basis. The FLSA requires that these employees be paid overtime at the premium (time-and-one-half) for actual time worked in excess of 40 hours per week.
  • Exempt employees are employees who, based on the duties performed and the manner of compensation, are exempt from the FLSA minimum wage and overtime provisions. Exempt employees are paid an established monthly or annual salary and are expected to fulfill the duties of their positions regardless of the hours worked. They do not receive premium overtime, straight overtime or compensatory time for working more than 40 hours in a work week.
  • Salary Basis Test: requirement that employees be paid at least $455 week or $1,971.66 a month "on a salary basis", which means that the employee must receive his full predetermined salary for any week in which he performs any work, without regard to the number of days or hours worked or the quality or quantity of work performed.
  • Duties Test: defines three categories of jobs which may be exempt from the overtime entitlement: executive, administrative and professional. Computer professionals may qualify as exempt under the professional exemption if they meet special duties criteria and are paid either on a salary basis or an hourly amount which is at least $45.84 per hour. In addition, certain seasonal, recreational employees can be considered exempt from certain provisions.

The FLSA did not apply to the University until 1966; coverage lasted only a short time before a Supreme Court decision voided coverage. Another Supreme Court decision in 1985 paved the way for FLSA coverage of virtually all public employees. Congress implemented this decision, which applied to the University, in 1986.

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The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), governs the process that Compensation Analysts use to determine whether a position is either eligible for over-time pay for hours worked in excess of 40 per week (non-exempt) or is paid a flat sum for hours worked, even if they exceed 40 hours within a workweek (exempt).

FLSA History

The Fair Labor Standards Act, (FLSA), is a federal law dating back over half a century which establishes certain minimum requirements for employees' hours of work, wages, premium overtime and payroll records.
The FLSA, identifies two types of employees: non-exempt employees and exempt employees:

  • Non-exempt employees are employees who, based on the duties performed and the manner of compensation, are required to account for time worked and sick leave, vacation, and other leave on an hourly and fractional hourly basis. The FLSA requires that these employees be paid overtime at the premium (time-and-one-half) for actual time worked in excess of 40 hours per week.
  • Exempt employees are employees who, based on the duties performed and the manner of compensation, are exempt from the FLSA minimum wage and overtime provisions. Exempt employees are paid an established monthly or annual salary and are expected to fulfill the duties of their positions regardless of the hours worked. They do not receive premium overtime, straight overtime or compensatory time for working more than 40 hours in a work week.
  • Salary Basis Test: requirement that employees be paid at least $455 week or $1,971.66 a month "on a salary basis", which means that the employee must receive his full predetermined salary for any week in which he performs any work, without regard to the number of days or hours worked or the quality or quantity of work performed.
  • Duties Test: defines three categories of jobs which may be exempt from the overtime entitlement: executive, administrative and professional. Computer professionals may qualify as exempt under the professional exemption if they meet special duties criteria and are paid either on a salary basis or an hourly amount which is at least $45.84 per hour. In addition, certain seasonal, recreational employees can be considered exempt from certain provisions.

The FLSA did not apply to the University until 1966; coverage lasted only a short time before a Supreme Court decision voided coverage. Another Supreme Court decision in 1985 paved the way for FLSA coverage of virtually all public employees. Congress implemented this decision, which applied to the University, in 1986.

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